All Style, No Fashion

Japanese Garden Juniper

This low sweeping juniper (juniperus procumbens “nana”) is my first attempt at bonsai.  The semi-cascade evergreen is characterized by circular, energetic lines.  The foliage pads are carefully groomed to expose the dominant main branch that extends dramatically beyond and below the lip of the pot.  The minimal, neutral-colored oval pot is a perfect match for the lines of the tree.  The lone white stone against the dark soil supplies an intriguing focal point for the viewer.

Here the tertiary upright portion of the tree is already groomed but the main branch has yet to be shaped.

A bit of cooper wire bends the previously rear-facing secondary branch around the side to mimic the main line.

A small jin on the rear side and detail moss provide complexity to an otherwise simple composition.

Japanese Boxwood

My roommate and I created our first bonsai.  This is a Japanese Boxwood (Buxus microphylla).  The composition is characterized by lazy, peaceful, and strong elements.  The main line runs from the back right across the dominant trunk, into the exposed root structure.  The tree is positioned leaning back across the negative space in the back corner.  The top of the center trunk line leans forward over the viewer, giving a feeling of height.  The liberal use of moss gives an appearance of a large, old tree on a hill in a meadow.

The exposed root structure and wide dominant trunk are the two best elements of this boxwood.

Shinola, New Center’s popular new watch- and bicycle-maker, on Friday unveiled four city clocks as thank-you gifts to Detroit.
Shinola and city officials gathered outside Cobo Center to unveil the first clock, a 13-foot-tall pole-mounted timekeeper that is an homage to the city’s Kern’s clock on Woodward Avenue. The other three clocks, which also went up Friday, are at Eastern Market’s Shed 3, in Midtown at a future dog park at Cass and West Canfield and at Shinola’s headquarters at the College for Creative Studies.
“Since we began our journey in this great city, we have been overwhelmed with the enthusiasm and support shown by the Detroit community,” said Steve Bock, Shinola’s CEO. “We feel privileged to have the city clocks among some of the most notable places in Detroit and hope they are enjoyed by all.”
Full story: The Detroit News

Shinola, New Center’s popular new watch- and bicycle-maker, on Friday unveiled four city clocks as thank-you gifts to Detroit.

Shinola and city officials gathered outside Cobo Center to unveil the first clock, a 13-foot-tall pole-mounted timekeeper that is an homage to the city’s Kern’s clock on Woodward Avenue. The other three clocks, which also went up Friday, are at Eastern Market’s Shed 3, in Midtown at a future dog park at Cass and West Canfield and at Shinola’s headquarters at the College for Creative Studies.

“Since we began our journey in this great city, we have been overwhelmed with the enthusiasm and support shown by the Detroit community,” said Steve Bock, Shinola’s CEO. “We feel privileged to have the city clocks among some of the most notable places in Detroit and hope they are enjoyed by all.”

Full story: The Detroit News

Trunk Club: Not a Fit

You may have heard of the concierge men’s wear service Trunk Club.  The advertized benefits are that they’ll hand-curate a trunk full of clothes, ship them to your door, you can try everything on, and then you return the unwanted gear and pay for what you keep.  I decided to give it a run.  Spoiler if you don’t want to run on: if the whole point of the service is personalized items, you have to send the right sizes; otherwise, it’s all going back.

The price point was a little higher than I normally spend, but not terribly so.  The problem was that nearly every piece was not as requested, the wrong size, or a bad fit.

Nice presentation and branding.  Also came with a prepaid return label.

Probably the best piece in the trunk was this Billy Reid pea coat, custom made or at least custom labeled for Trunk.  Nice leather detail work.

Here’s a perfectly wearable banker’s collar on a bengal.  Never mind that I already own this shirt, but I told Trunk I wear 16/33 and this is a 17.5/44.  Why would you bother sending this?

Here’s a really nice pair of hand-painted Fratelli Rossetti’s in dark brown (not as black as they look in the picture).  I told them I didn’t need brown shoes, only black or burgundy.  Oh yeah, and I wear 10.5 and these are 9s.  Couldn’t wear them if I wanted to.

The trunk also included an assortment of thin merino sweaters and a navy unlined summer blazer that was two sizes too big.  They also sent a pair of gaberdine slacks, after I requested no pants because I’m not in the market right now.

On the plus side, I did request items from their classic/conservative collections and the items were certainly that.  All greys, blues and browns.  Probably too muted for my taste but at least that part was as requested.

If you’re going to bill your service as hand-curate and specifically focused on the customer’s requests, you gotta hit the basics: match the sizes sent in the trunk to the sizes requested on the forms.

Trunk Club was not a fit for me.